Welcome

Welcome to my wargaming blog,
I'm Dave and live in Morpeth, Northumberland in the UK.
This may or may not be a regular thing, we'll just have to see how it goes.

I am a painter/collector of figures first and a wargamer second. My thrill in this great hobby of ours is to place that final well researched & painted unit into the cabinet. The actual gaming with the figures is an important but secondary experience, we all like to win, but it isn't the be all and end all of it, being with good friends and having fun is.
Hope you will enjoy reading this blog as much as I will writing in it.
Just to remind the visitor to scroll down the various pages and click on 'older posts' to see more.
Dave.

Sunday, 13 November 2016

The Battle of Croissant 1798

A fun Saturday came and went yesterday at the Border Rievers Wargames Society in sunny Northumberland playing out the battle of Croissant (Ha!) set around 1798 or thereabouts during the French Revolution.
The scenario, developed by Chris was for a mixed British/Vendean force having made a raid in force into Republican territory to escape off the beach taking the spoils with it. A certain percentage of the allied force must be picked up by the boats, taken to the ships anchored off shore while being covered by the rear guard on the beach which is being assaulted by an ever growing force of French Republican troops. The French reinforcement would depend on a die roll.
The troops were mainly mine but with health contributions by the aforesaid Chris and Tom.


A general view of the battlefield, the beach can be seen on the right, the French will deploy on the left of the picture and the British/Vendean troops plus supplies on the hoof are on the table.

HMS Bell End

Marines and ships crew

Jolly Jack tar to the rescue

The beach area
Would the boys make a pigs ear of this!

Monsieur Le Pumpernickel's servants about to leg it out of the chateau.
The first Republican Demi Brigades arrive on the table



A 24pdr siege gun placed on the headland.

The allied right, Vendean cavalry and foot

Peasant infantry armed with, well just about anything!
An episode of Trumpton, Windy Miller has legged it. (only middle aged Brits will get this!)

The British centre, AWI Brits but they will do.

The Republican French in their centre got somewhat carried away, charged the solid line of British infantry with artillery in support and got the predicted result!
On the French left an exposed Vendean battalion is about to be charged in the flank. It didn't happen by the way, my dice were of the usual standard.


They did force the Vendean's back however.


Two to one, hit in the flank with columns and the Vendean troops were still just pushed back disordered, sometimes you dispare.


The allies were beginning to get troops off the beach by this time.
Vendean cavalry

A brigade of French dragoons arrive commanded by Mick.

They soon get pitched into the opposing cavalry routing them immediately.
The French left pushes on past the windmill



It was later agreed that we should have attempted to get the French artillery onto the field much earlier than we did, they could have then bombarded the beach slowing the allied withdrawal.


The allies eventually succeeded in getting the troops and supplies off their beachhead, we all concluded that though the French made some mistakes, charging the British centre unsupported and not getting the artillery on fast enough, that if doing a re-run that the french needed one more brigade of any arm on the field from the start and that a greater percentage of allied troops needed to be embarked for victory.
Never the less a great game and fun was had by all.
Dave.

Saturday, 5 November 2016

15mm Confederate cavalry brigade.

A run of the mill but necessary addition to the confederate forces for my campaign game with Mick. I was borrowing his figures to compleate my corps, now at least the cavalry brigade is done. Of courese as with all cavalry capable of fighting dismounted you have to paint mounted, figures on foot and the horse holders. Oh well, they came out ok.







Union cavalry next though I do fancy adding some 15mm French Chasseurs to my napolionic lads.
At least I won't have to do dismounted figures for thm!
Dave.

Sunday, 30 October 2016

Battle of Atlanta 1862, campaign.

Following on from the battle of Oberglau See here: Mick and I recently fought our second battle of the campaign using the second of our three corps. If you recall we have three corps each fighting a series of battles pitting each corp against one another one at a time with the victory points (for objectives gained, enemy troops killed or captured and terrain controlled) used to reinforce as we go. The victor will be the one who wins five consecutive battles on the trot.

The next scenario was the battle of Atlanta.



The map of the battle field above shows green hills, streams, roads, wooded areas and the odd village. As you can see it was a particularly cut up field of battle with many obstacles making it quite difficult to manoeuvre for both sides, much like many U.S. battlefields I suspect.
My Confederate corp entered from the top of the map as you look while Mick's Union from the bottom.
I sent my three reb divisions on with the intention of occupying and holding the two main ridges in the centre, i.e. Bald Hill and the ridge with Troop Hut on it (marked on map). I felt that this would dominate the Georgia railroad which ran through the centre of the battlefield fighting a defencive battle with my 2nd corps, my weakest as it contained quite a few green brigades.
Mick entered on a slightly broader front than mine with the main part of his force on the left side of the Georgia railroad. I don't know what his original plan was but as you will see it worked pretty well!


A Confederate cavalry brigade with supporting horse artillery move forward to delay the Union advance, they did but the horse battery was wrecked.


My right hand reb division march onto the field and occupy portions of Bald Hill.


While on my left two divisions were faced by only one Union division. The Confederate plan to occupy both ridges and sit on the defencive went straight out the window!



They piled straight through the Union force to their front and turned to their right to take the rest of the Yankee army in the flank - yeah right!


Not a great photo I'm afraid but it does give a general view of my right hand side of the field while the other action was taking place on my left. As you can see Mick's heavy left hook, though taking a bit of time getting into position was going to cause havoc once it arrived.



Above is what my weaker right wing mostly green forces were about to get a taste of. Later Mick asked why I didn't withdraw my right at this point, and looking back he was right. I did think that if the boys could hold them for a few turns then my victorious left wing would come in on their flank and roll em up. But the terrain took it's toll and they didn't get there in time.
Mick played it well, softened the Confederates up then hit them all at once. The rebs folded like a pack of cards.

On my right this was what was left, not a pretty sight. The whole battlefield had rotated like a door with both sides left swinging round.
At this point we called it a day, both sides withdrew. Given what happened to my right wing I think I got away with it. Points wise it was pretty close but I did loose more men so a close win to Mick. No hard feelings - the sod!
Dave.

Friday, 21 October 2016

Nearly done, 10mm Caesarian Romans

It has been a while since I last tackled these fellows, my 10mm Caesarian/Pompeian legions have sat short of five cohorts for about two years but now with my policy of getting armies to a 'playable' completion I figured that these lads were next in line.
For the moment there are one and a half legions per side along with supporting cavalry and skirmishers. I do have a few Numidian cavalry to do and I must admit that I would like to add more legionaries eventually but for now this is where I am at:



This is the latest legion to be completed. Each unit represents a cohort (the first cohort being double size of course). The castings are mostly Old Glory with some Magister Militum thrown in though I do intend to look around at other manufacturers later on.
 Skirmish types and Gallic cavalry.




Finally a view of the lot, two full legions, two half legions with cavalry/skirmish support.








The cavalry in these photos are more eastern sorts.
The intention will be to fight a campaign using Columbia Games, Julius Caesar a fantastic board game of the civil war period as a gaming tool.

ACW 15mm Confederate cavalry next!
Dave.