Welcome

Welcome to my wargaming blog,
I'm Dave and live in Morpeth, Northumberland in the UK.
This may or may not be a regular thing, we'll just have to see how it goes.

I am a painter/collector of figures first and a wargamer second. My thrill in this great hobby of ours is to place that final well researched & painted unit into the cabinet. The actual gaming with the figures is an important but secondary experience, we all like to win, but it isn't the be all and end all of it, being with good friends and having fun is.
Hope you will enjoy reading this blog as much as I will writing in it.
Just to remind the visitor to scroll down the various pages and click on 'older posts' to see more.
Dave.

Friday, 27 March 2020

Encounter at Richendorf 1800. 28mm French Revolution.

Being in self isolation which I may add many people have been calling for for many years regardless of any pandemic which is going about, I have finally managed to nag Chris into digging around in his neither regions (i.e. somewhere on hid computer file) to find the pictures he took of our last French Revolutionary game about a month or so ago. He sent me these today so onto the blog they must go.
Set in the Rhineland area in 1800 it sees a French army attempting to hold back a large Austrian counter attack with the Austrians being gradually reinforced as the game goes on.


The battlefield on the day with the French positioned on the hill to the right defending the village of Richendorf and the Austrian forces crossing the shallow river to assault them head on.


A French combined Grenadier battalion with other French line units in support.






Horse and line artillery batteries.





Various French line battalions.



French Chasseurs and hussars










Various pictures of the advancing Austrian infantry.






Austrian cavalry.





Austrian artillery batteries.




Mark (of Reiver Casting fame, more notoriety actually!) brought along his huge collection of Austrians for their reinforcements.




















A bunch of photographs of the action at hand.



The final scene at the end, the Austrians had lost a couple of brigades assaulting the French centre but were getting reinforced and pushing up hard on their left. A good game which truthfully had been cobbled together at pretty much the last minute to accommodate the large number of guys wishing to take part hence the fat that some white coated French units can be seen thrown in to make up the numbers when they would not have been present in 1800.
Thanks as always to Chris for the photos.
Hope you enjoy,
Dave.

14 comments:

  1. Glorious! Massive battle, thanks for the eye candy. The Revolutionary French are more interesting to me than the Napoleonic ones.

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  2. Looks fantastic Dave, awesome armies, terrain...and photos!!

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  3. What a lovely table and game. I will keep on coming back to this.

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  4. I really like the Consular period uniforms and not just the French ones - Austrians in Kaskett are a firm favourite. They are hard to find in smaller scales - although BM are solving that - which limits on table manoeuvre - the table looked pretty big but the battle looked cramped. What rules were used in the game?

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    1. Rob, see below, sorry I wrote Guy instead of Rob, senility with the lockdown!

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  5. Thanks as always for the comments lads, Guy you’re right the table was somewhat cramped as so many people wished to participate on the day that I had to bring a lot of figures but 28mm will do that to you! They’re pretty and all that but if you want more realistic manoeuvring room then 15 or even 10mm is where you should go. Doing it again on that scale I would have increased both the width of the table and used back boards or just told some of the lads to sod off and play their own game. Nah, just joking. The rules are the best set out there General de Armee by Dave Brown a club favourite.

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  6. Wow, those are stunning -simply superb. What a treat - thank you

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  7. Simply lovely Dave, one cant beat well painted toys and terrain, well done.

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    1. Cheers Robbie credit to Chris's photographic skills though!
      Dave

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